Doug Hart is confirmed dead at the age of 80.
Doug was best known as a American football player (Green Bay Packers).
RT @AgRetailers: ARA’s Minnesota delegation in the Hart Senate Office Building getting ready for meetings with their members of Cong…
RT @ThePerfect10ant: @TheHibikiTMD Let's go one better. Bruce Hart vs Naito with Doug Dillinger and Oliver Humperdink in their respective corners
@TheHibikiTMD Let's go one better. Bruce Hart vs Naito with Doug Dillinger and Oliver Humperdink in their respective corners
Mine are Jimmy Carr, bill hicks, Pryor, Dave Chappelle, Frankie Boyle, bill burr, Carlin, Seinfeld, Chris rock, Edd…
RT @XavierBands: JBO has been working with many clinicians over the past couple months including six over the past week. A big thank…
JBO has been working with many clinicians over the past couple months including six over the past week. A big thank…
@DougJones Keep on keeping on Doug. You got his number.
@cbs11doug @xfl2020 @XFLRenegades Hey Doug remember Jerimiah Hart who Was injured badly in car wreck few years bac…
@doug_scott @carlosdajackal @hkanji There is legal precedent for different judicial methods of interpreting Statute…
RT @yax75: @oldbrew75 Free Doug! @ Red Hart Brewing
@oldbrew75 Free Doug! @ Red Hart Brewing
RT @kylegriffin1: Inbox: Rep. Bill Pascrell, Jr. has nominated Senators Mitt Romney and Doug Jones for the Profile in Courage Award b…
Looks like fun. NBA- Steve Nash/Pascal Siakam NFL- Doug Flutie MLB- Tony Fernandez Boxing- Tommy Gun Spencer (My…
Front l/r Chris Oldham (MO) Andy Ferguson (NC) Keith Morris (GA) Brent Butler (NC) Brian Roberts (NC) Jon Adkins (W…
RT @BleacherReport: Kevin Hart’s impression of Bron had JR rolling 🤣 (via #ColdAsBalls | @LOLnetwork)
@tom_hart Doing as I’m told. Doug Shows Gun Show I see.
RT @genemueller: By my count there are now just 20 living members remaining from the @packers 1966 Super Bowl I squad. Add Willie to…
RT @genemueller: By my count there are now just 20 living members remaining from the @packers 1966 Super Bowl I squad. Add Willie to…
RT @kylegriffin1: Romney's vote makes him the first senator to vote to convict a president of the same party in an impeachment trial…
RT @genemueller: By my count there are now just 20 living members remaining from the @packers 1966 Super Bowl I squad. Add Willie to…
Doug Hart
Position:Cornerback, Safety
Personal information
Born:(1939-06-06)June 6, 1939
Handley, Texas
Died:January 1, 2020(2020-01-01) (aged 80)
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Fort Worth (TX) Handley
College:Arlington State
Navarro College (JC)
Undrafted:1963
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:15
INT yards:436
Fumble recoveries:5
Games played:112
Player stats at NFL.com
Douglas Wayne Hart (June 6, 1939 – January 1, 2020) was a professional American football player, a defensive back who played eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League.
Contents
1 Football career
2 Hart and Vince Lombardi
3 Post-football career
4 References
5 External links
Football career
Born and raised in Handley, Texas, which was later annexed by Fort Worth, Hart played high school football at Handley High School in Fort Worth. He played two years of junior college football at Navarro College, then walked on at Arlington State College (now University of Texas at Arlington) and earned a football scholarship.
Unselected in the 1963 NFL draft and AFL draft, Hart was signed as a free agent by the St. Louis Cardinals, who waived him in training camp. He was picked up on waivers by the Packers in and spent all of that 1963 season on the Packers' taxi squad, but played in every Packers game from 1964 through 1971; he retired in training camp in August 1972 at age 33.
In his NFL career as a cornerback and safety, Hart had 15 interceptions. Perhaps the most notable of them was his 85-yard interception return for a touchdown against the Minnesota Vikings at Milwaukee County Stadium in 1969—the longest interception return in the NFL that season. As of 2011, his five defensive touchdowns were tied for fourth place all-time for the Packers. As a player, he was part of the Packer teams that won an unprecedented three consecutive NFL championships, which concluded with the first two Super Bowls.
While with the Packers, Hart lived in Green Bay year-round and the outdoor-minded Texan embraced winter sports, taking up alpine skiing and snowmobile racing. He won races on an Arctic Cat snowmobile, a company that he would later serve as vice president.
Hart and Vince Lombardi
Legendary Packers coach Vince Lombardi signed Hart to play for Green Bay after Hart had been cut by the Cardinals and had gone to work for Bell Helicopter for two days. After playing for the Packers in an exhibition game in Dallas, the Packers brought him up to Green Bay, where he was pleased to sign a contract: "Lombardi said I was going to be on the taxi squad as a rookie for $500 a week. That was more money than I’d ever seen in my life."
As was the case with many of his players, Lombardi left a lasting impression upon Hart: "I think of Coach Lombardi and his philosophies in one way or another almost every day...He taught us to do your very best at whatever you're doing. He always said, 'When you walk off this field, you want to have those people in the stands say they just saw the very best playing at their very best.' " In a 2013 interview, Hart said of his former coach, "He was a humane person, he really was...He was big and strong and he could get very hard (with people) sometimes, but when a person needed help he was available.” Hart's teammate, guard Jerry Kramer, specifically mentioned Hart in an op-ed article he wrote for The New York Times in 1997: "Max McGee, too, is a wealthy businessman (he founded Chi-Chi's, the chain of Mexican restaurants). So are Paul Hornung, Bart Starr, Doug Hart and a dozen others who didn't leave the game as rich men. All are still driven by Lombardi -- not because he ranted and raved but because he wanted desperately to see us do well."
Post-football career
After his playing career, Hart was a successful businessman. He was an Arctic Cat distributor in Neenah and later a vice president for the snowmobile manufacturer, and COO of Satellite Industries, a portable toilet manufacturer. He also ran a textile factory and, late in his career, became a licensed fly fishing guide in Florida. He moved back to Minnesota in 2007 to be closer to his children and grandchildren. Hart died on January 1, 2020 at the age of 80.
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